Marjorie Young

The Psychic View – The Blind Side

By Marjorie Young

‘Love is blind’…‘There are none so blind as those who will not see’…‘When you fall in love…smoke gets in your eyes.’ These oft-repeated phrases have moved into the realm of cliché. Yet, how maddeningly, even bewilderingly true they are.

The question looms…why do so many remain steadfastly oblivious to very obvious pitfalls? Romantic love is not always the cause, but if it is present, it undoubtedly complicates the situation. But what creates an unwillingness to examine facts, draw rational conclusions, and thereby save ourselves a world of trouble?
One painful instance involves a woman who was brutally assaulted as a college student. She blames herself for not following her instincts to avoid this person. Yet now, years later, she has chosen to date a man with a prison record for the very same type of crime…while finding excuse after excuse for his behavior.

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The Psychic View - 'Alien’ Thoughts

By Marjorie Young

An interesting thing happened as I prepared to write this month’s column. I ran the topic of ‘life out there’ by several friends. Their reaction took me by surprise. One responded with a cry of, “Ugh…Aliens! Can’t you write about healing or something instead?” Another greeted the idea with an embarrassed silence, followed by firm suggestions that I reconsider. Instead of discouraging me however, I found their feedback intriguing. Why should the proposition of life beyond our planet prove so unnerving?

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Photo by Shane Harms
Three oil cars derailed under the Magnolia Bridge in southern Interbay.

New Year, New Common Sense Approach to Climate Change


By Lu Nelsen, lucasn@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs

Our nation spent nearly $7 billion responding to extreme weather in 2013. Events that endanger livelihoods nationally, and especially in rural and small town America. These destructive storms, devastating droughts, dangerous flooding and paralyzing winter weather highlight the need for action. We must confront threats that climate shifts pose to rural communities, and the nation.

The new year provides an opportunity to take commonsense steps to address carbon pollution, a major contributing factor to these threats. Currently, there is no limit on the amount of carbon pollution that American power plants can emit, but new rules from the Environmental Protection Agency would help limit these emissions.

Closing loopholes for high-polluting power plants is crucial to protect community health and our natural resources. Several other power plant by-products are limited, but carbon emissions have been overlooked, leaving the door open for some of the biggest polluters in the nation to get off scot-free.

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