King County welcomes new director 
of police oversight

Seasoned advocate and Washington native Deborah Jacobs will lead OLEO

The Metropolitan King County Council announced today the hiring of Deborah Jacobs as Director for the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight (OLEO), an independent government agency with responsibility for reviewing complaints relating to the King County Sheriff’s Office, its policies and practices.
 
“I can’t imagine a better place than King County to advocate for best police practices and the interests of its residents,” said Jacobs, a native of Washington State. “With diverse communities that are passionate about fairness, a sheriff with a strong reputation for accountability and a climate geared to best practices and professionalism, I feel confident that together we can not only serve the people of King County, but also play a leadership role as a nationwide model for effective oversight and collaboration.”
 
Jacobs takes the helm of a newly strengthened agency. In November, King County voters approved a measure to expand OLEO’s authority to investigate complaints. New precedents for investigations and advocacy will be established under her leadership.
 

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Burke-Gilman Trail “Missing Link” Draft Environmental Impact Statement now available

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) has completed the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Burke-Gilman Trail Extension Project (Missing Link) and has made the document available for public comment. The DEIS evaluates four alternatives for connecting two existing portions of the Burke-Gilman Trail between the intersection of NW 45th Street and 11th Avenue NW, and the Ballard Locks.

SDOT will hold two public hearings to provide information about the DEIS and to solicit public comments. The public hearings will be held at Leif Erikson Hall, 2245 NW 57th Street on:

• Thursday, July 14
6 – 9 p.m.
Presentation at 6:15 p.m.; public comments: 7 – 9 p.m.

• Saturday, July 16
10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Presentation at 10:15 a.m.; public comments: 11a.m. – 1 p.m.

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Photo courtesy of City of Seattle
DADU in Ballard. O’Brien believes that backyard cottages, or Detached Accessory Dwelling Units (DADUs,) have the potential to provide a significant amount of affordable housing. His office claims that if just five percent of eligible lots in Seattle build DADUs it would generate close to 4,000 housing units.

O’Brien proposes legislation to open door for more cottages and small dwellings

In order to address density and growing need for housing City Councilmen Mike O’Brien has released a proposal for legislation that would change the municipal code to allow more flexibility for building small detached dwelling units.

After hearing feedback from the community about current regulations Councilmember O’Brien says that there are “significant burdens on homeowners” when deciding to build backyard cottages or mother-in-law units.”

According to his office, as of December 2015, 221 backyard cottages have been built or permitted in Seattle since 2009; however, there are approximately 75,000 single-family lots that are eligible to build.

O’Brien believes that backyard cottages, or Detached Accessory Dwelling Units (DADUs,) have the potential to provide a significant amount of affordable housing. His office claims that if just five percent of eligible lots in Seattle build DADUs it would generate close to 4,000 housing units.

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