Peggy Sturdivant
After meeting questions for Mike O'Brien.

At Large in Ballard: People are angry

By Peggy Sturdivant

I wasn’t going to write a column this week. Then on Thursday, January 21, Ballard News-Tribune reporter Shane Harms asked if I could cover a one-hour meeting that started in two hours. He had to work his other job as bartender. He owes me.

To sum up seven pages of notes in three words: people are angry. It had been dark for hours with over two inches of rain but the Odd Fellows’ Ballard-Alki Lodge #170 was packed at 7 p.m. Seattle District 6 City Council member Mike O’Brien had accepted an invitation from Stop Ballard Pods Apts. to discuss micro-housing, congregate housing, Single Efficiency Dwelling Units (SEDUs), parking exceptions and impact fees.

At Ballard District Council I wondered where are all the upset residents I see online? I have my answer. They had been at a Magnolia meeting on public safety a week earlier, Wallingford Community Council meeting the night before and they were at the lodge on Thursday night.

So this is yet a report on a meeting I didn’t plan to attend in a column I didn’t plan to write (at least this week).

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Amanda's View: Oasis as counterbalance, or vise versa

By Amanda Knox

Oasis. The word conjures sunlight, water, trees, the sensation of sinking into soft, white sand. Relief. Delight. I think of weightlessness, of the release of strain that comes not from the relief of burdens, but from their perfect counterbalance.

Take dancing, for example. In West Coast Swing class, I’m instructed to strive for the push and the stretch. My hands linked with my partner’s, we maintain a firm yet flexible frame to push into and stretch out from, following to the momentum of the particular dance phrase. In a push—sugar push, they say—we step into the space between us, compacting, but not collapsing, our frame. Our biceps and rhomboids tense, and like positively charged magnets, we bounce away from each other before we bonk noses.

More ›

Amanda's View: Oasis as counterbalance, or vise versa

By Amanda Knox

Oasis. The word conjures sunlight, water, trees, the sensation of sinking into soft, white sand. Relief. Delight. I think of weightlessness, of the release of strain that comes not from the relief of burdens, but from their perfect counterbalance.

Take dancing, for example. In West Coast Swing class, I’m instructed to strive for the push and the stretch. My hands linked with my partner’s, we maintain a firm yet flexible frame to push into and stretch out from, following to the momentum of the particular dance phrase. In a push—sugar push, they say—we step into the space between us, compacting, but not collapsing, our frame. Our biceps and rhomboids tense, and like positively charged magnets, we bounce away from each other before we bonk noses.

More ›